Community Servings

Summer Programs for Teens

Summer camps are a beautiful thing, especially when they align with your values and you feel like you designed the curriculum yourself. Land’s Sake is a wonderful place that has offering for all ages. My children both enrolled in Green Power last year (as did at least a dozen of their friends) and it is fantastic!

Green Power: ages 13 to 17 

  • For 13 through 17 year olds
  • Date July 8 – August. 23, 2013; Monday through Friday each week, 8:30am-3:30pm**
  • Cost: $400/week; Land’s Sake Family Level Members and above receive a 10% discount, all Members receive a multi-week discount
  • Students are offered a share of the profit based on their performance and attitude each day.

The Green Power Summer Youth Program at Land’s Sake farm is focused on learning about sustainable agriculture, food justice, and community through hard work.  This work includes weeding, planting and harvesting on our organic farm, leading farm tours, maintaining our education garden, community service and cooking a community meal.  In addition to being a great learning opportunity, Green Power teaches the value of meaningful work by giving participants the chance to earn a stipend from the work they do at the farm.  Join Land’s Sake and work hard while having fun!

Student Stipend & Rules: Students are offered a share of the profit generated by the sale of produce at the Land’s Sake farm stand based on quality of their work through week. Land’s Sake reserves the right to drop a participant from the program if he/she is not contributing in a positive manner and placing an unnecessary burden on the other students and staff.

The Green Power program provides teens with the opportunity to grow food, care for animals, mentor younger children, volunteer in the community, cook fresh food, work hard and have fun!

For additional questions, please contact Douglas Cook, Education Director, at

GreenPower@LandsSake.org or 781.893.1162.

[youtuber youtube=’http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nsRtOTgVSI4&feature=youtu.be’%5D

Land’s Sake also has great programs for the younger set:

Farm and Forest: ages 7 to 12

Preschool Discovery

Kindergarten Discovery

 

Did I mention that I met the artist of the beautiful cards (at Newton Open Studios)

Larry Grob

who is married to the chef who makes the meals with the kids at Land’s Sake on Fridays? I know, small world.

A Camp With A Purpose and It’s Green, too.

sunflowers lands sake weston post capability mom

Hail to the Pollinators Pastel, Larry Grob Land's Sake Farm Weston MA
Hail to the Pollinators, Larry Grob

Green Power Camp – Land’s Sake Farm in Weston

This summer has been full of surprises, not all good, like the blue green algae on the Charles that cancelled my daughter’s sailing classes (okay, postponed them). On short notice, she needed a Plan B. Enter Teenlife.com (a great resource we have used time and again) and I pulled up a link to Land’s Sake (another family favorite for pick your own flowers, berries and veggies).

Here is the description from Land’s Sake:

The Green Power Summer Youth Program at Land’s Sake farm is focused on learning about sustainable agriculture, food justice, and community through hard work. This work includes weeding, planting and harvesting on our organic farm, leading farm tours, maintaining our education garden, community service and cooking a community meal. In addition to being a great learning opportunity, Green Power teaches the value of meaningful work by giving participants the chance to earn a stipend from the work they do at the farm. Join Land’s Sake and work hard while having fun!

Here is the dirt (pun intended) from the first teen’s week.

Monday: The teens got to know each other, learned about taking care of small animals (goats and chickens), and harvested part of the garlic crop. Messy work. My teen was covered with a soft brown dusting of dirt and really happy about it, too. We still have fresh garlic.

Tuesday: The group traveled to Jamaica Plain to Community Servings to help prepare meals for chronic and critically ill patients and their families. Land’s Sake farmers donated collard greens which were packaged that day as well. They listened to a podcast of Michael Pollan on NPR on the drive there and back. Did I say I love this camp?

Wednesday (the Fourth of July): They harvested bok choy, peas, and carrots for a CSA to be delivered to low income families through a partnership between Horizons for Homeless Children and Community Servings.

Thursday: They were leaders during the Kid’s Café Program. This program enables kids from Greater Boston Boys and Girls Clubs to come out to the farm. The teen campers took them around the farm – garden, chickens, bees, the magic tree, goats and going for a ride on the bicycle-blender!).

Friday: Chef Ellen Touart-Grob helped to plan, cook, and serve up a delicious farm-inspired meal including Chilled Pea Soup, Fresh Summer Rolls, and Herbed Pop-overs!

Doesn’t this sound wonderful? The program also pays the teens a percentage of the profit from Land’s Sake farm stand based on quality of their work through week. Love that, too.

Teen 2 is going to this camp next and I will fill you in on her week.

I forgot to add that I received a hand-written note in the mail, thanking me for sending my child to the camp from the new Executive Director of Land’s Sake, Ed Barker (and it was on a gorgeous pastel of the beehives of the farm. Really). I wanted to write a thank you note for the thank you note, but you know where that leads. So I will write it here.

 

Dear Mr. Baker,

As a mom of two teen girls, we have been in some pretty terrific camps over the years, but none so wonderful as the camp at Land’s Sake. The program is thoughtfully planned, wonderfully executed and combines good values, community service, education, work, fresh air and fun.

I have never received a handwritten thank you note from one of them. I applaud your lovely camp program, your wonderful staff, your fantastic farm and your good manners.

With great appreciation,

 

Nancy Brown

 

Scones, muffins…are you in the know? Local area food donations go…? this is where you come in.

How do you help in your community?  I do a little bit but think I can do more.  The following was in this week’s  Newton Tab and  it was my husband’s idea to post it on my blog (thanks, honey). It also ties in with a project I am working on with two friends.

The Newton Food Pantry needs help.  It is a great organization run by volunteers in the basement of the (former) Waban branch libary (the building is now run by the Waban Improvement Society).  The Village Bank ( a local Newton bank) is partnering with the Newton Pride Committee  to re-stock the shelves of the food pantry.  Donations are welcome from April 5-19 in collection boxes at Village Bank locations throughout Newton and at the Newton Cultural Center in Newtonville.  If you are in the area, they are looking for donations of non-perishable foods, toiletries, diapers and cleaning products.  Many thanks.

This leads me to the project.  One day, while talking with two friends, the question came up about what happens to stuff at local bakeries at the end of the day.  We each chose a bakery, now that we have places that are willing to donate, we are looking at how to get the food to places that need it. 

New York City has City Harvest which is  a  “food rescue organization”.   It started with a group of volunteers (25 years ago) who “connected and a handful of neighborhood restaurants to food programs serving meals to those in need”.  So far the response has been overwhelmingly positive and we haven’t even gotten to restaurants yet.

I know about Community Servings in Boston and the Greater Boston Food Bank , two wonderful organizations. Is there already a City Harvest model  in Boston? Is there anything like it?

Do you know anyone who has started something like this? Any help would be appreciated. Please feel free to send this along.

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