American Academy of Ophthalmology

Keeping Safe in the Sun and A Great Giveway: Stylish Sun Protection

bulletin board posting at community boating boston capability mom blog
On the bulletin board at Community Boating Boston

community boating inc boston ma capability mom blogNow that my kids can (and do) apply their own sunscreen, mornings go a bit faster…okay, a lot faster. I know it adds time to your morning routine but it is so important to apply sunscreen every day. Here are a few other reminders and resources about the importance of sun protection.

SunAWARE is a sun safety awareness program from the Children’s Melanoma Prevention Foundation, the Dermatology Nurses Association and Melanoma Foundation of New England to provide SunAWARE™ education nationally. Great tips in an easy to remember format and just last week they featured an awareness day at Community Boating in Boston.

SunAWARE
Avoid exposure to sunlight, seek shade, and never indoor tan.
Wear sun protective clothing, including a long-sleeved shirt, pants, a wide-brimmed hat, and sunglasses year-round.
Apply recommended amounts of broad-spectrum sunscreen with a sunburn protection factor (SPF) greater than or equal to 30 to all exposed skin and reapply every two hours, or as needed.
Routinely examine your whole body for changes in your skin and report concerns to a parent or healthcare provider.
Educate your family and community about the need to be SunAWARE.

Also check out Be Eye Smart in the Sun from the American Academy of Ophthalmology. I know my dermatologist shares this suggestion: Wear a hat along with your sunglasses; broad-brimmed hats are best so much so that Krauss Dermatology (my derm) is giving away a super cute sun hat from and some Elta UV Pure Sunscreen – a gift set valued at over $70.

Plus, while you are entering the giveaway, you are also helping the Melanoma Foundation of New England because Krauss Dermatology will donate for every Facebook “Like” $1 to the MFNE. Enter to win and help out a great non-profit that helps educate and assists patients and their caregivers struggling with melanoma by offering free support groups, educational programs, and Billy’s Buddies, a one-on-one patient advocacy and support program.

Follow the easy directions below and you could win this very nice gift! Click on a Rafflecopter giveaway for more chances to win!

sunhat and sunscreen from krauss dermatology sunsafety giveaway and capability mom blog

Fourth of July Safety

One summer when I was quite young I was without a book and ransacked my aunt’s bookshelves and came up with Follow My Leader (it had a boy protagonist but I read it anyway), and it really stayed with me ans scared me. The main character Jimmy, is blinded by an errant firecracker (okay, a firecracker that a mean boy threw in his direction – not on purpose but, still). Now I am not really calm in general, but home fireworks make me even more nervous and it turns out I am not alone or wrong.

I received an email as part of an outreach campaign to create awareness of the dangers of home fireworks and am more than happy to share the information here.

From The American Academy of Ophthalmology

Children are at High Risk for Fireworks Eye Injuries

Of the 9,000 fireworks-related injuries each year, 21 percent are eye injuries and more than half of the victims are young children or teenagers. For example:

  • A 6-year-old child’s eye was severely injured after he lit an M-80 firework that he found in his home. He called 911 (mp3 audio) and underwent an immediate cornea transplant and lens replacement, and required several additional eye surgeries.
  • A 12-year-old boy forgot to unwrap the fuse of a fountain firework, making the fuse too short. It exploded almost immediately and blew up in his face, seriously injuring his eye.
  • After a man lit smoke bombs that created colored smoke, his 4-year-old son leaned in to get a closer look. Tar from the smoke bomb wick shot into the boy’s eye, causing a corneal abrasion.

“Many Americans get caught up in the excitement of the Fourth of July, and forget that fireworks are also dangerous explosives,” said Monica L. Monica, M.D., an ophthalmologist and clinical correspondent for the American Academy of Ophthalmology. “The safest choice is to attend a professional fireworks display, and make it a point to supervise children at all times.”

Even sparklers are dangerous. Sparklers typically burn at 1,200 degrees Fahrenheit and cause 27 percent of all fireworks injuries, including third-degree burns. Bottle rockets cause some of the most serious eye injuries. Errant bottle rockets can injure bystanders and cause eye lid lacerations, corneal abrasions, retinal detachment, optic nerve damage, rupture of the eyeball, and complete blindness. One in every six fireworks-related eye injuries results in permanent vision loss or blindness.

To prevent eye injuries, follow these EyeSmart tips:

  • Never let children play with fireworks of any type.
  • View fireworks from at least 500 feet away.
  • Leave the lighting of fireworks to trained professionals.
  • Respect safety barriers set up to allow pyrotechnicians to do their jobs safely.
  • If you find unexploded fireworks, do not touch them. Immediately contact your local fire or police departments.

If you experience an eye injury during a fireworks accident, seek immediate medical help. For more fireworks safety tips or to find an eye M.D. in your area, visit http://www.geteyesmart.org.


 

Fireworks are not legal in Massachusetts – Please be safe this holiday and leave the pyrotechnics to the professionals!

%d bloggers like this: