Real Life

Swollen feet, social ‘ept-edness’ and flowers at the library

Swollen feet notwithstanding, I had a great night.  The library fundraiser went off without a (discernable) hitch.  Sure, a computer crashed during check-in but only because of an over-zealous book return.  The library was transformed in to spring-like bower (flowers by Whole Foods and 1-800-flowers).  Authors* hosted and honored – check.  Guests well-fed (wonderful food from Bakers’ Best) and entertained (Tom Ashbrook and Bill Novak  as hosts – check.  Great silent auction items scooped up – check.

The library was transformed by a team of dedicated volunteers and library employees who have been working towards this day since last year.  We range in age from 40 (ish) to 80 (ish) and share a love of books and the library. We are some or all of the following: visual, literary, quiet, chatty, giving, caring, considerate, kind, opinionated, employed, retired, SAHMs, socially adept**, talented, and dedicated.  We spend a good amount of time in the weeks leading up to the event putting together auction items, labels, programs, name tags, planning the catering, setting up the event, getting babysitters,chatting up the event to friends, selecting and buying books to go with each auction item (from the New England Mobile Book Fair  – long-standing supporters of the library) , and wrapping, wrapping, wrapping.  We are lucky to have a community that supports the library with donations of professional services, goods and one time events (Kiss 108 concert and tour of studio) and the wonderful people who host authors, bid on auction items, support the library with time, energy and showing up for events like this one.

* Authors celebrated last evening:  James Carroll, Anita Diamant, Lisa Genova, Jean Kilbourne, Sara Lawrence Lightfoot, Mitchell Zuckoff.

** I have the temerity to invent the word “ept” as in inept or adept in front of the editor of the local paper, The Newton Tab.

Cooked – in a good way

Friends have a way of keeping you connected and grounded.  They can also teach you a great deal.  This week I learned how to make a delicious rémoulade, baked rice and that stuffing garlic butter and herbs under chicken skin isn’t so gross if you do it with a friend.  I co-hosted a PTO progressive dinner (not here – thank you, R & G) and spent a day prepping dinner, running errands and ironing table linens. My co-host (and an amazing cook) did that and much more.  I will post the full recipes under the recipe page. All wonderful.

My favorite part of the day was, well, all of it. Prep-work flies by when chatting with friends and adding special ingredients and fielding  a flurry of calls for add-on items while shopping keeps things interesting.  The connections are wonderful: a local florist, the fabulously organized friend (and the point person for last night) who delivered gift bags to the hosts on her bike, and the other interesting parents we got to meet and re-connect with last night.  There was a nice balance of quiet and busy time, I ironed while watching an old movie with my children and later our children and a family friend helped serve the dinner and clean up.

Connecting with the school community is more of a challenge when middle school years start.  There are no hallway conversations at drop-off, pick-up or on the playground so you have to make more of an effort to connect with other parents and the school community. Not to worry!  There are always plenty of volunteer opportunities, both large and small.  Help with a teacher appreciation lunch or Principal’s coffee.  Heck, if you have more time – volunteer more!

Stop me before I volunteer again!

I really look like this.

It is true.  I have a problem saying no and it seems pretty pervasive among my friends.  This results in over-booking (you know, sure I have to get the kids to school by 8 but I can still get that batch of cookies I promised for the teacher lunch in).  When the idea or project is worthwhile, which they all are, it is really hard to say no.

I remember saying yes to my first committee before I even  knew what a committee was.  My children were very young at the time and I was thrilled (!) to be asked to contribute.  It was a great experience and I met some amazing women. All of the other things I have worked on since have been wonderful experiences, too.  It isn’t about not wanting to help. It is about making it work for you and your family.  Here is my new intent – I will say “I would really like to but am working on quite a bit now, can I think about it and get back to you?”   It isn’t a no, it is a delay until you can truly assess what the time commitment entails (If I say this to you, you saw it here first).  I am working on the balance that I need to make good on all of my intentions and not over-book (a family tradition).

Mammogram Day

Not such a red-letter day but a reminder to get your mammogram.  Yes, I know there was a study that said women don’t need an annual mammogram.  There is other information that says it is the right thing  to do.  Here is the link to the Susan G. Komen site  http://ww5.komen.org/ and the National Breast Cancer Foundation, Inc.  http://www.nationalbreastcancer.org/.  Good link to Time magazine about the controversy.  http://wellness.blogs.time.com/2009/11/17/new-mammogram-recommendations-spark-controversy-and-confusion/

1 48 49 50 51

%d bloggers like this: